The importance of customer feedback

We are lucky in Toowoomba to have a wide variety of medical and allied health services that deliver excellent care, but none of us can improve if we don’t get feedback. We’ve had some new families choose us to help their children recently and these parents have commented on how different our service was to some other health services they had experienced in other locations. I hope that the experiences they relayed were rare experiences but the feedback they’ve provided on our service has helped us to know how we can continue to improve our service. We encourage families to provide as much feedback as possible to their health service providers because we know from firsthand experience that it makes a real difference and often if there’s an issue there’s a simple solution we can easily put in place if we only know there is a problem. Sometimes people only provide feedback when they have a complaint to make so were were extremely grateful to these clients for providing feedback on the things they loved. This helps us to know what to keep doing or to do more of. Here are 3 things we are continuing to focus on at Chatterbugs because our clients love it: 1. Parents get the answers they need. One mother related how with many medical and health appointments she feels like she answers a barrage of questions from the professional but that then her questions don’t get clearly answered in return. She said, “I love Chatterbugs’ Simple Steps Plan that outlines exactly where are are, where we are going and the first steps to get there.” For every new assessment...

Sight words success

Sight words are vital for developing fluency in reading – and they can be the bane of a parent’s existence after the first flush of excitement of starting to learn to read settles down! The pressure that comes with trying to keep up with the expectations for reading progress can get in the way of a child developing a love reading and all that comes with it. In this episode, Lisa Hudson interviews fellow Speech Pathologist and author of “The Essential Sight Words Guide For Parents”, Rachel Tosh. Rachel and Lisa discuss some key (and simple) strategies to take the pressure down several notches when teaching children sight words and help to make reading easier and more enjoyable. Listen to the interview here Buy the ebook...

Toy Tales

This simple idea is lots of fun, encourages imagination, teaches oral language and literacy skills and results in a special home-made book your child can treasure for years to come. All you need is a smart phone or a camera. The child helps to take photos of their favourite toy/s in little activity scenes such as eating breakfast, watching television, making a mess in the bathroom and sleeping on the couch. Be creative – you can search the internet and use “Elf on the Shelf” ideas to inspire your own scene creations if you want. You and your child can print the pictures out and stick them into an exercise book or display folder to tell a little story. Alternatively, you could tell the story while scrolling through the photos on your phone or camera. An app that can also be used to create these stories on your phone or iPad is Little Bird Tales. What adventure is teddy going on...

10 Tips for Supporting Language Development at Home

If you are concerned about your child’s language development the best thing you can do is see a Speech Pathologist. But perhaps it’s not possible for you to access support immediately, but you’d like to be doing something while you wait. Maybe you have a child who you feel could benefit from just little bit of extra help, even though their language is within the normal range. Whatever the reason, if you want to help boost your child’s language development, here are 10 tips for things you can do at home. 1. Talk every day. The most important thing your child needs to develop their language skills is to hear you talk. Spend as much time interacting with your child as you can. This doesn’t have to be playing or doing structured activities together. You can talk while you do just about anything – cooking, washing, getting dressed… Talk as much as you can. Try to limit the amount of time your child spends in front of a screen and substitute interaction instead. Most of my son’s first words came from doing housework together! 2. Get on the same level. When you are talking, it will help keep your child’s attention if you are on the same level. If they are playing on the floor, get down on the floor with them. If you are cooking at the bench, perhaps they can stand on a chair beside you. Having easy access to your face makes it easier for your child to watch and hear how you speak and will make them more likely to copy you. 3. Take a...